Commentary

Evacuees Today, California’s Students Tomorrow

It is highly likely that today’s Afghan evacuees are your students tomorrow, or sometime in the near future. California is presently and historically a magnet for newcomers—immigrants and refugees alike. Fleeing from persecution is just the beginning of a perilous journey towards an unknown destination for safety. That was my family’s refugee experience. 

Statement in Response to the January 6 Storming of the U.S. Capitol Building

We condemn all actions and actors that encouraged or participated in the insurrection and desecration of our nation’s Capitol and endangered our democracy’s long history of peaceful transfers of power. As a statewide network of history-social science educators, the California History-Social Science Project is resolved to defend our democratic ideals in order to take a stand against this and any demonstration of racism, injustice, and abuse of power.

Gratitude

The song Mother Blue’s is sometimes wildly inappropriate, but I can’t help but feel inspired when Ray Wylie Hubbard gets to one of the last lyrics. “And the days that I keep my gratitude higher than my expectations,” Hubbard sings, “well, I have really good days." 

The Movement for Black Lives

Justin Leroy studies the history of the United States in the 19th Century, specializing in African American history. This blog post originally appeared as an article in "Teaching in 2020" - the fall 2020 issue of our online magazine, The Source.

By Justin Leroy, Ph.D., Department of History, UC Davis

Teaching the Election

A Professor of History at UC Davis, Kathryn Olmsted studies the cultural and political history of the United States since World War I. We interviewed Professor Olmsted to get her take on campaigns during times of crisis, the role of the media, and her best suggestions for government students this fall.

The Source: Teaching in 2020

New Issue of The Source Now Available for Download

We’re very excited to announce the release of the Fall 2020 edition of our online magazine, The Source.  This issue, entitled Teaching in 2020, is organized into four sections – the pandemic, the fight for racial justice, economic collapse, and the election – to offer insight, ideas, and the opportunity to hear from your colleagues across the state.  Articles include essays from leading historians on the historical context of the Black Lives Matter movement and the pandemic, the 2020 presidential election, and th

Statement in Response to the Death of George Floyd

We value and honor Black lives. The death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has sparked national outrage, days of protest, violence, and destruction of property in many cities across the United States, including here in California.  That this is happening in the midst of a pandemic in which communities of color, particularly Black and Latinx Californians, are suffering and dying disproportionately heightens the urgency of the moment.

Parents' Guide to History-Social Science

My family just started week five (or is it week six – I’ve officially lost the will to keep count) with our three elementary-school-aged children at home, and while we’re so fortunate to be together, our family’s attempt at distance learning feels like a mess.  In week one of shelter in place, which seems like a lifetime ago, I was almost optimistic about having time alone at home to work and to experiment with some school work with my kids

2020 is Just the Worst

I’m just going to say what we’ve all been thinking – 2020, you’re the worst, and no one likes you.  We didn’t have high expectations for you as a year – but really, did you have to sink so low?  It’s bad enough that you are an election year – we knew to expect the name-calling that comes with political campaigns.  But then you decided to reignite our fears of a drought (and fire season) by preventing rain from falling for much of the winter.