Sites of Encounter in the Medieval World

Drawing on new historical scholarship about the Mediterranean world, maritime technology transfers, travel narratives and multicultural trade cities, students consider:  How did sites of encounter change the medieval world?

 

a     Unit Introduction
  • Sicily, Mongol Empire, & Quanzhou
  • Voyages of Zheng He
  • Cairo, Black Death in Afro-Eurasia
  • Mali and Majorca
  • Calicut
a    Sicily 
  • Introduction to the Medieval World
  • Encounters in 12th-Century Norman Sicily
  • Merchants and Trade in the Medieval Mediterranean
  • Exchanges in Sicily and the Mediterranean
  • Why was Normal Sicily a Site of Encounter?
a
 
    Quanzhou
  • Chinese Technology and Society
  • Cultural Interaction
  • Reading Travel Narratives
  • Marco Polo and Ibn Battuta
   
 

 

a
 
    Cairo
  • Mapping Cairo
  • Islamic Trade-Pilgrimage Network
  • Slave-Soldiers in Egypt
  • The Black Death: A Fatal Exchange
 
a     Mali
  • Crossing the Sahara
  • Gold-Salt Trade
  • Spread of Muslim Religion and Culture in West Africa
  • Writing Travel Narratives
  • Individual Research Project
 
a    Majorca
  • Crossing the Sahara
  • Gold-Salt Trade
  • Spread of Muslim Religion and Culture in West Africa
  • Writing Travel Narratives
  • Individual Research Project
   
 
a   Calicut
  • Spices and Trade Goods
  • Trade Patterns in the Indian Ocean
  • Cultural Encounters at Calicut
  • Spread of Cultural and Religious Influences in South and Southeast Asia

 

Sites of Encounter in the Medieval World has been funded, in part, through the generous support of the Social Science Research Council and the British Council. 

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