Top Image

You are here: Home / Home / About / Teachers and Scholars

Teachers and Scholars

#IamCHSSP

created May 06, 2015 12:46 PM
Six months from today, the California History-Social Science Project (CHSSP) will be welcoming teachers, academics, local and state officials, History Project Alumni and leadership to Carnesale ...

Six months from today, the California History-Social Science Project (CHSSP) will be welcoming teachers, academics, local and state officials, History Project Alumni and leadership to Carnesale Commons at UCLA for a conference to accomplish two things: explore the current state and future of the discipline in the age of Common Core, and celebrate everyone who has contributed to the continued success of the CHSSP.

We have already published excerpts of interviews in The Source, on our website, and on Facebook. Now we will be posting entire interview responses and profiles on our blog. By the time you take your seat at the gala dinner on November 6th, you’ll know how exceptional these educators are. And if you know of someone who deserves recognition for their work with CHSSP, but haven’t seen their face, please let us know. Send us an email at .

 

#IamCHSSP: Carlos Noreña

created Jun 11, 2015 11:40 AM
Q: Please describe your connection with the Project. When did you first get involved and what have you done? A: My first experience with the Project was as a faculty speaker in a summer ...

Q: Please describe your connection with the Project. When did you first get involved and what have you done?

A: My first experience with the Project was as a faculty speaker in a summer workshop (on the theme of art and imagery as historical evidence).  I was so impressed by the engagement of the teachers, and so struck by their enthusiasm and the incisiveness of their questions and comments, that when I was later asked to serve as faculty coordinator I accepted with great enthusiasm!

Q: What is a favorite moment you’ve had in connection with the Project?

A: My favorite moment in connection with the Project is not really a single moment, but rather a recurrent pattern, which is to see previous participants in History Project workshops stepping up to serve as facilitators for the other workshops.  It’s such a wonderful reminder of our shared commitment to our craft, and to the constant challenge of improving as teachers. 

Q: If you were to recommend the History Project to a friend, what would you say?

A: I would happily recommend the History Project, and would say that it provides essential professional development for primary and secondary school teachers, mainly in and around the Bay Area.  It also serves, crucially, for the transfer of knowledge from libraries, archives, and seminar rooms to primary and secondary school classrooms.  The key operations of the History Project are workshops, held throughout the school year, and summer institutes.  At History Project workshops, teachers develop a range of pedagogical skills focused on lesson plans, strategies for reading and writing, and the evaluation of students, all connected in one way or another with historical topics. 

Q: What has the Project meant to you, and what do you see as its role in the future of history education?

A: Though the History Project is primarily oriented towards primary- and secondary-school teachers, it has also made me a much better instructor at the university level.  What has really been brought home to me time and time again is the similar set of challenges faced by history instructors at all levels.  In particular, I have learned that we all work to get students to think historically—to weigh conflicting evidence critically, and to make compelling arguments that seek to explain change over time—and to develop a historical sensibility about the past.  I am hopeful, then, that the History Project can continue to bridge the gap between middle school, high school, and university teachers, and to reinforce the important pedagogical continuities over the whole K-16 curriculum.

- Carlos Noreña

Associate Professor, Department of History, UC Berkeley

UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project 

 

#IamCHSSP: Nancy Witt

created Jun 10, 2015 11:01 AM
  Diane L Brooks Award recipient, curriculum coach, teacher specialist, and teacher leader, Nancy Witt, shares her history with CHSSP and some of the things she values most about her work with ...

 

Diane L Brooks Award recipient, curriculum coach, teacher specialist, and teacher leader, Nancy Witt, shares her history with CHSSP and some of the things she values most about her work with UCLAHGP.

Q: Please describe your connection with the Project.  When did you first get involved and what have you done?

A: I became involved with the UCLA History-Geography Project for the first time in 2005-when my school district, Glendale Unified, partnered [with UCLAGHP] and wrote a Department of Education Teaching American History Grant.  We were awarded that Grant and then another one in 2010.  I was part of both writing teams and I then served as the Curriculum Coach for the Grants.

Q: What is a favorite moment you've had in connection with the Project?

A: There were so many great moments, I would suppose a favorite moment was planning the many staff development opportunities and then visiting our teachers’ classrooms and seeing the implementation of not only the history content but also strategies for delivering the content.  I will always remember the excitement of one of our elementary teachers as she had her students complete a gallery walk on transportation-a lesson she wrote. She said she would have never thought of teaching the Westward Movement using a gallery walk before participating in our grant!

Q: If you were to recommend the History Project to a friend, what would you say?

A: I did a lot of recruiting of colleagues for our grant cohorts-I usually did not have to say too much!  Word of mouth usually brought them in!  A good example of this would be some of my teachers attended a staff development opportunity outside our district, and they sent me a selfie telling me they were so excited because this activity reminded me of the type of high quality educational experiences they used to have participating in the grant.

Q: What has the project meant to you, and what do you see as its role in the future of history education?

A: The project still means a lot to me-I check out each email to see if it is a topic and at a time I can attend.  It is a way to stay current, share strategies, and make connections with other teachers.  They provide an extremely valuable resource.  I am back in the classroom full-time and I love to hear from my teachers that they have attended some event at a museum or UCLA.  I cannot imagine teaching without the resources and instruction I have received from the Project. I used lessons from the both The Civil War (AP students) and the excellent Cold War [History Blueprint] resources for my classes this year as well!  My students were very engaged and learned a lot from those lessons-they liked them!

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share?

A: I cannot even begin to tell you how much Emma Hipolito and Mary Miller have meant to our teachers.  Their example was always so important and valuable to me-I still work with teachers in my district and many of the teachers who participated in the grant have now taken on leadership roles within our district as part of the shift to the Common Core State Standards.  The History Project was always our inspiration and provided us with the guidance, materials, and contact necessary to facilitate this shift. 

Nancy Witt

Teacher, Clark Magnet High School

UCLA History-Geography Project

 

#IamCHSSP: Jasmin Brown

created Jun 10, 2015 10:58 AM
Did you know Jasmin Brown, CHSSP participant, teacher leader, and curriculum developer, was a conference star? In this interview, she outlines her contributions to CHSSP, shares her views on CHSSP ...

Did you know Jasmin Brown, CHSSP participant, teacher leader, and curriculum developer, was a conference star? In this interview, she outlines her contributions to CHSSP, shares her views on CHSSP in the Common Core Era, and reveals her most memorable moment.

Help us thank teacher leaders like Jasmin for their work at our 25th Anniversary celebration this November at UCLA.

Q: Please describe your connection with the Project.  When did you first get involved and what have you done?

A: I have been involved with the projects at the CSU Dominguez Hills and CSU Long Beach sites for nine years. In 2006, I became a participant through the Lynwood Unified School District partnership and Teaching American History grant. As a teacher leader, I have participated in various projects with the CHSSP, such as curriculum development.  I co-authored the Civil War History Blueprint, [curriculum] aligned to the California Common Core and History Content Standards. I’ve also presented webinars focused on historically based inquiry, literacy, and writing strategies. In addition, I have also had the pleasure of presenting at the California Council for History Education, the California Council for Social Studies and the National Council for History Education, along with local workshops for teachers in neighboring school districts.

Q: What is a favorite moment you've had in connection with the Project?

A: My favorite moment that I have had in connection with the project is when I was selected to do a promotional video for the project. The filming process was extremely exciting for both my students and me.  It was an honor to attend the American Historical Association Conference in Boston, where the video was played throughout the conference hotel and meeting rooms. A workshop attendee walked up to me during the conference and said, “You are the teacher from Lynwood.” I felt like a star and smiled the entire duration of the conference.

Q: If you were to recommend the History Project to a friend, what would you say?

A: If I were to recommend the History Project to a friend, I would tell them that it is extremely beneficial to your professional development as a history teacher. It gives you the opportunity to enhance your historical knowledge and teaching methodologies. Teachers are taken beyond the standard form of history instruction, which only requires that they teach dates, facts, and vocabulary. It also shows you how to develop your students’ critical thinking skills as well as their abilities to think like historians. You learn how to corroborate primary versus secondary sources, use textual evidence when examining text, and determine the credibility of sources. Historical thinking is a very challenging approach to history instruction and the project places great emphasis on equipping teachers to meet this non-traditional approach to learning.

Q: What has the Project meant to you, and what do you see as its role in the future of history education?         

A: The CHSSP has really helped me hone my craft as a history teacher. Collaborating with college professors and my secondary school colleagues has improved my content knowledge and lesson delivery. My instruction is now more focused on preparing my students, with the skill set that is needed, for survival in college, and the real world, rather than just their current grade level. I think that the CHSSP will be a very essential institution to helping teachers to transit into the new Common Core era. The projects that I have participated in, such as the History Blueprint and the webinars, are geared towards the implementation of Common Core [State Standards] and serve as an examples for model history instruction.

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share?

A: I look forward to witnessing the impact that the CHSSP will have on this new wave of instruction. I also hope that more local school districts will become exposed to their innovative approaches and methods to teaching history. I am proud to be a part of an organization that is dedicated to truly improving the teaching profession.

-Jasmin Brown

Teacher, Cesar Chavez Middle School, Lynwood Unifi­ed School District

The History Project at CSU Long Beach

 

#IamCHSSP: Raymond Lopez

created Jun 10, 2015 10:00 AM
In this interview, teacher leader Raymond Lopez shares what he appreciates most about the project. Help us thank teacher leaders like Ray for their work at our 25th Anniversary celebration this ...

In this interview, teacher leader Raymond Lopez shares what he appreciates most about the project. Help us thank teacher leaders like Ray for their work at our 25th Anniversary celebration this November at UCLA.

Q: Please describe your connection with the Project. When did you first get involved and what have you done?

A: I am a teacher leader with the UCLA History Geography Project. I first became involved in 2000 and was asked the following year to come back as a teacher leader when the Project ran a two-week long summer institute on the UCLA campus. Since then, I have had the opportunity to present model lessons and various teaching strategies at numerous conferences, symposiums, and workshops. My most recent work has been with the Places and Time Summer Institute held yearly in partnership with the Automobile Club of Southern California where I get the opportunity to help teachers develop lessons using the Auto Club Archives.

Q: What is a favorite moment you’ve had in connection with the Project?

A: Although I’ve experienced many wonderful moments with the Project, certainly one of my favorites was getting the opportunity to present a lesson with UCLA geographer Denis Cosgrove on war mapping in twentieth-century Los Angeles. Not only did I get to hear a preeminent scholar on a fascinating subject, I was able to piggyback on his presentation and present a complementary lesson entitled “Making Memorable Maps.”

Q: If you were to recommend the History Project to a friend, what would you say?

A: I have recommended the program to colleagues many times with the hope that they can experience the collegial atmosphere of the institute. In addition, I tell them about the opportunity to listen to a multitude of some of the finest professors in Southern California, have the time and opportunity to experience true historical research in an archival setting, and perhaps most importantly, feel like a professional working to master one’s craft.

Q: What has the project meant to you, and what do you see at its role in the future of history education?

A: The program has opened up many doors to me. I have had the opportunity to meet a multitude of wonderful teachers and grow as a professional. The Project plays a key role in the future of history education by offering opportunities for teachers to expand their historical knowledge and develop quality lesson plans to engage student learning.

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share?

A: Just that I feel so fortunate to work with so many wonderful people each year through the [UCLA] History Geography Project. Emma Hipolito, Mary Miller, and Krystal Cheek, among others, have been instrumental in my development as a teacher, and have constantly challenged me to grow as a professional.

-            Raymond Lopez

Teacher, La Hambra High School

UCLA History-Geography Project

 

#IamCHSSP: Mike Anderson

created Jun 10, 2015 09:55 AM
“I first became involved with UCIHP [University of California, Irvine History Project] in 2010 when my principal encouraged me to attend UAC or Understanding American Citizenship, a professional ...

“I first became involved with UCIHP [University of California, Irvine History Project] in 2010 when my principal encouraged me to attend UAC or Understanding American Citizenship, a professional development program for history teachers. The UAC/UAH program lasted for four years and during that time, I got to visit places I had never been to, meet fascinating people and listen to some amazing speakers.  As a veteran, I felt very at-home with some many of our experiences such as visiting The U.S.S. Midway and the Air and Space Museum in San Diego.

“The pinnacle of my UAC experience was our visit to Angel Island in San Francisco. Other highlights were visits to The Chinese American Society of America, Japanese American National Museum (JANM) in Los Angeles and The Museum of Tolerance (MOT). I also really enjoyed the visit to the Agua Caliente Museum in Palm Springs and the summer institute on teaching The Cold War using primary source material.

“Among the interesting people we heard from were Dean Erwin Chermerinsky of The UCI Law School and his wife on separate occasions. We also heard presentations from other members of academia and the judicial system.

“If I were to recommend the UCIHP to a colleague, I would give them examples of what we have done and seen. I would talk about the great lessons I have gotten from others and then used in my own classroom, especially those using primary sources.

“The UCI History Project has exceeded my hopes and expectations for professional development in a lot of ways, but mostly I like the depth and common core focus of the material. I have gained so many lesson ideas that it has really made teaching History more enjoyable and hopefully more interesting for my students.”

-Mike Anderson

He has taught at Otto Fischer School for The Orange County Department of Education since 2001. He began his teaching career in Plano, TX in 1999. Born and raised in Portland, OR, Mike has a B.A. in History from Oregon State University and an M.Ed in Curriculum and Instruction from The University of Texas at Austin. Mike is a former Infantry Officer in the Army National Guard and commanded troops at the platoon and company level on three major deployments to Saudi Arabia, Kosovo and Iraq. He and his wife Jean have two sons, Braden and Austin.

 

#IamCHSSP: Stacey Greer

created Jun 10, 2015 09:41 AM
In this interview, educator and consultant Stacey Greer describes her connection with the California History-Social Science Project, how she first become involved and some of her accomplishments. ...

In this interview, educator and consultant Stacey Greer describes her connection with the California History-Social Science Project, how she first become involved and some of her accomplishments. Help us thank leaders like Stacey for their work at our 25th Anniversary celebration this November at UCLA.

 “I participated in my first History Project at UC Davis workshop on the Cold War as a pre-service teacher in 1995 or 1996, and completed my first summer institute, Literature and Narrative in History in 1999 (?). I drew the short straw at that program, and had to be the first teacher to present a lesson from my classroom in front of the other more experienced participants; I was so nervous! I guess the Project liked it, since they kept asking me back. I gladly accepted, having found a community all working toward rich, engaging, inquiry, and primary source based history teaching. 

“In 2001, then UCD Project Director Nancy McTygue provided me with my first leadership opportunity—as the leader of a new a series called Writing in the History Classroom. This marked the beginning of my work with literacy.  It was exciting to work with other expert teachers to develop practical tips for improving writing and share those activities with other teachers both in the Sacramento region and throughout the state network.

“At the same time, the Project began collaborating with Mary Schleppegrell, [then Associate Professor of Linguistics and Director of English as a Second Language, University of California, Davis], to research linguistic analysis of historical texts to help English learners and students with low literacy break down and analyze complex history text in a discipline-specific manner.  Soon we integrated all of the Project’s literacy efforts to create the Building Academic Literacy through History program. 

“In 2003, I joined the History Project at UC Davis full time as the Literacy Coordinator to continue the efforts to translate the linguistics research and into practical applications and replicable instructional models that teachers would find useful for students. That first year, I coordinated the CHSSP Literacy Leadership Retreat to share this groundbreaking literacy work that the UC Davis and UC Berkeley sites were working on across all of the network sites. This was an exciting opportunity to work with colleagues across the state. I thrived on this professional collaboration throughout my tenure with the Project, because it pushed us to ask hard questions to improve discipline-specific literacy instruction in history.

“I believe this collaboration among the sites in literacy specific to the discipline of history is what equipped the California History-Social Science Project to make a strong transition as support providers in implementing the Common Core State Standards.  My final work at the UCD Project was to lead our first Teaching the Common Core State Standards through History-Social Science Instruction summer institute in 2012. Over my time at the project I led many world history and US History programs, but I benefitted most from the opportunities to collaborate with the CHSSP network on literacy and I am most proud of my contributions to the CHSSP literacy work.”

-Stacey Greer, Education Programs Consultant at California Department of Education

 

#IamCHSSP: Bryan Shaw

created Jun 09, 2015 11:19 PM
#IamCHSSP: Bryan Shaw Teacher leader Bryan Shaw reflects on his development as a teaching professional and on how CHSSP has contributed to that process, in this interview. Help us thank ...

#IamCHSSP: Bryan Shaw

Teacher leader Bryan Shaw reflects on his development as a teaching professional and on how CHSSP has contributed to that process, in this interview.

Help us thank teacher leaders like Bryan for their work at our 25th Anniversary celebration this November at UCLA.

"My first experience with the UC Berkeley History-Social Project was through the Teaching American History Grant in 2007. I remained a participant through 2009, at which point I became a teacher leader. I remained in that position until the end of the Grant in 2013. I have been participating in the summer programs offered thorough the UCBHSSP since 2007, which have included co-directing the Implementing the Common Core summer institute, participating in the NEH World War II Landmarks Summer Institute in 2014, facilitating several summer institutes through UC Berkeley, and presenting at the 2012 NCHE conference in Kansas City, Missouri.

"My favorite moment I’ve had in connection with the project was presenting at the NCHE conference is 2012.  Eric Forner was the keynote speaker and he presented on his new book about Abraham Lincoln’s evolving views on slavery. The other aspect of the project that I highly value is the professionals I get the privilege of working with at the workshops and professional development opportunities.

"I have continually recommended the History Project to friends and colleagues because it is, in my perspective, one of the few worthwhile professional development opportunities that value the expertise of every person that is in the room and treats participants like professionals.

"When I first got involved with the project, I was sure I had the teaching profession figured out. I realized my students had trouble with reading and writing, but I was not a literacy teacher, so it wasn’t my problem. Actually, I didn’t have the tools to help my students read, write, or work with primary sources, so it was easier for me to blame other teachers for not teaching the skills. After meeting some of the fantastic professionals at UC Berkeley, I realized I had room to grow and that the project was a safe place for me to explore how to be a better teacher in a collaborative and supportive environment."

-        Bryan Shaw

Teacher, Mount Diablo High School

Mount Diablo Unified School District

UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

 

#IamCHSSP: Raymond Lopez

created May 26, 2015 09:54 AM
#IamCHSSP: Raymond Lopez In this interview, teacher leader Raymond Lopez shares what he appreciates most about the project. Help us thank teacher leaders like Ray for their work at our 25th ...

#IamCHSSP: Raymond Lopez

In this interview, teacher leader Raymond Lopez shares what he appreciates most about the project. Help us thank teacher leaders like Ray for their work at our 25th Anniversary celebration this November at UCLA.

Q: Please describe your connection with the Project. When did you first get involved and what have you done?

A: I am a teacher leader with the UCLA History Geography Project. I first became involved in 2000 and was asked the following year to come back as a teacher leader when the Project ran a two-week long summer institute on the UCLA campus. Since then, I have had the opportunity to present model lessons and various teaching strategies at numerous conferences, symposiums, and workshops. My most recent work has been with the Places and Time Summer Institute held yearly in partnership with the Automobile Club of Southern California where I get the opportunity to help teachers develop lessons using the Auto Club Archives.

Q: What is a favorite moment you’ve had in connection with the Project?

A: Although I’ve experienced many wonderful moments with the Project, certainly one of my favorites was getting the opportunity to present a lesson with UCLA geographer Denis Cosgrove on war mapping in twentieth-century Los Angeles. Not only did I get to hear a preeminent scholar on a fascinating subject, I was able to piggyback on his presentation and present a complementary lesson entitled “Making Memorable Maps.”

Q: If you were to recommend the History Project to a friend, what would you say?

A: I have recommended the program to colleagues many times with the hope that they can experience the collegial atmosphere of the institute. In addition, I tell them about the opportunity to listen to a multitude of some of the finest professors in Southern California, have the time and opportunity to experience true historical research in an archival setting, and perhaps most importantly, feel like a professional working to master one’s craft.

Q: What has the project meant to you, and what do you see at its role in the future of history education?

A: The program has opened up many doors to me. I have had the opportunity to meet a multitude of wonderful teachers and grow as a professional. The Project plays a key role in the future of history education by offering opportunities for teachers to expand their historical knowledge and develop quality lesson plans to engage student learning.

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share?

A: Just that I feel so fortunate to work with so many wonderful people each year through the [UCLA] History Geography Project. Emma Hipolito, Mary Miller, and Krystal Cheek, among others, have been instrumental in my development as a teacher, and have constantly challenged me to grow as a professional.

-            Raymond Lopez

Teacher, La Hambra High School

UCLA History-Geography Project

 

#IamCHSSP profiles have moved

Now, you will find the link to the profiles of CHSSP teachers, scholars, and leaders on our Home page. Click on Teachers and Scholars to find out more about the many people dedicated to improving student learning and literacy through teacher professional learning, curriculum development, and educational research.

#IamCHSSP: Stephanie Reyes-Tuccio

created Jun 11, 2015 11:22 AM
Q:  Please describe your connection with the Project.  When did you first get involved and what have you done?            A: I was fortunate to be the first Director of the History Project at ...

Q:  Please describe your connection with the Project.  When did you first get involved and what have you done?           

A: I was fortunate to be the first Director of the History Project at UCI in 2000.  Those first years were marked by a great deal of learning, creativity and building a bridge to teachers and schools.  It was an exciting time when we began to develop relationships between local teachers and the university around our shared love of history and our common belief in students.

We charted new territory developing partnerships to innovate academic literacy instruction, wrote several successful Teaching American History grants, and drew on the strengths of our world and U.S. history faculty, teachers and graduate students to develop curricula that I still think is some of the best I have ever seen.

Q:  What is a favorite moment you've had in connection with the Project?

A: There have been many moments that are memorable.  One that I treasure is a meeting in my office with the current staff including a middle school teacher on loan, several graduate students, myself, and a faculty member.  We were collaboratively visioning and planning a new program.  It was one of many moments with this collective when ideas flowed, a program took shape by continuously being reworked and improved with smart and interesting contributions by all.  We all couldn't talk fast enough.  A colleague saw us through the glass window and came and spoke with me afterwards.  He said,  "I don't know what you all were talking about in there, but it looked like magic was happening."

Q: If you were to recommend the History Project to a friend, what would you say?

A: The History Project is an intellectual home for those of us who believe in the power of history instruction to change the way students think and therefore to impact the world.  You can find a virtual or physical intellectual home, a community of learners, and a vehicle to continually grow in your practice as a teacher and your knowledge of the discipline.  You and your students will be better because of your engagement.

Q: What has the Project meant to you, and what do you see as its role in the future of history education?

A: The Project had a profound effect on me and my career trajectory.  It helped me to understand the need for the university to see its mission and engagement more broadly.  It directly led to my current role as Executive Director of the Center for Educational Partnerships where I oversee the subject matter projects as well as K-12 academic preparation and undergraduate student success and retention programming.

Its role in the next stage of history education will be to help bring to fruition the promise of the Common Core to create truly educated, analytic thinkers who can evaluate and formulate arguments based on evidence, as well as write, and read critically.  Imagine!

- Stephanie Reyes-Tuccio, Ph.D

Executive Director of the Center for Educational Partnerships, UCI

The History Project at UCI

 

#IamCHSSP: Sarah Gold McBride

created Jun 10, 2015 11:00 AM
#IamCHSSP: Sarah Gold McBride Sarah Gold McBride has contributed in many ways to the UCBHSSP, including her role in the creation of The Teaching History: Historical Thinking Across the K-16 ...

#IamCHSSP: Sarah Gold McBride

Sarah Gold McBride has contributed in many ways to the UCBHSSP, including her role in the creation of The Teaching History: Historical Thinking Across the K-16 Continuum Conference this past May. You can read about the conference -- which included 150+ educators across the K-12 and college levels --  in a news item at the UC Berkeley History Department's webpage: http://history.berkeley.edu/news/department-hosts-international-conference-history-education. You can find out more about Sarah in the following interview.

"I first became involved with the [UC Berkeley History-Social Science] Project during my first year of graduate school in 2011, when I applied to be the Graduate Student Advisor to the 11th grade teachers involved with the Teaching American History (TAH) grant in the Mt. Diablo Unified School District, which was managed through the UCBHSSP office. Since then, I have had the opportunity to be involved with UCBHSSP in many ways. I have given lectures to teachers in the UCBHSSP network, helped to plan and run multiple week-long summer institutes, written an article for The Source, and helped get other graduate students involved with UCBHSSP. This year, working together with UCBHSSP and the working group I co-founded (History Graduate Student Pedagogy Group), we organized an exciting conference in May 2015: "Teaching History: Historical Thinking Across the K-16 Continuum."

"My favorite moment with the Project was in May 2013, when everyone involved with the Mt. Diablo TAH grant gathered together to say goodbye. (Congress chose not to continue the national TAH program, so our TAH grant was ending).  All of the teachers, graduate students, and staff who had met monthly for so many years came together to share what TAH had meant to them. I felt so full of joy when I saw so acutely how powerful this program had been to so many people -- though I also felt sadness that the program was ending due to circumstances beyond our control. Nevertheless, it was a wonderful moment to be able to stop and celebrate all of the tremendous work that the Project and its teacher network had done for the students in our community, and I was so grateful to get to be a part of it.

"I would absolutely recommend the Project to a friend; over the past four years, I've helped get many of my graduate student colleagues involved with the Project. What I've told them is that of all the experiences I have had in graduate school, my work with UCBHSSP has probably been the greatest resource to improve my own teaching. As much as I have had the opportunity to contribute to the professional development of the K-12 teachers we work with, I have gained fivefold in my own improvement as a teacher.

"For me, the Project has been one of the best parts about being in graduate school. I have been so inspired and humbled by the wonderful K-12 teachers I have had the privilege to work with, and it has made me more reflective and driven about my own role as a teacher. I have been interested in teaching since I was a teenager, but thanks to UCBHSSP, an interest has turned into a passion.

"The role I see the Project playing in the future of history education is as an indispensable source of professional development for history teachers. The work the UCBHSSP does to bridge the gap between K-12 and college-level history is crucial, which is why I was so excited to be part of the "Teaching History" conference this May! Being able to facilitate learning, conversations, and reflections among history teachers at all levels is what makes the Project different from other professional development resources.

"Above all, I can't say thank you enough to the staff of UCBHSSP who took a chance on me as a first year graduate student -- thus allowing me to be part of this tremendous community!"

-Sarah Gold McBride

Teacher and graduate student

UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project 

 

#IamCHSSP: Chrislaine Pamphile Miller

created Jun 10, 2015 09:59 AM
Teacher facilitator Chrislaine Pamphile Miller is the focus of this post. She describes her connection with the California History-Social Science Project, how she first became involved and a ...

Teacher facilitator Chrislaine Pamphile Miller is the focus of this post. She describes her connection with the California History-Social Science Project, how she first became involved and a favorite moment from a summer institute. Help us thank teacher leaders like Chrislaine for their work at our 25th Anniversary celebration this November at UCLA.

“Currently, I am a teacher facilitator with the UC Berkeley History Social Science Project. I first became involved with UCBHSSP in 2001 as a middle school teacher in the Oakland Unified School District, where I participated in several summer institutes as a classroom teacher. Inspired by this experience with this program, I returned to graduate school for a Ph.D. in history and currently work at California State University Monterey Bay and Santa Clara University as a lecturer in the Global Studies and history departments.

“In addition to my teaching, I also work with UCBHSSP as a teacher facilitator for the summer Common Core Institutes and throughout the school year in the Santa Clara Unified School District teaching historical literacy strategies to middle and high school teachers.

“A recent favorite moment with the History Social Science Project occurred last summer, when I shared an undergraduate assignment with the Common Core Summer Institute participants. I demonstrated how I use literacy strategies with first-year university students and then had the teachers in the audience provide me with feedback for my lesson using the Lesson Protocol that we ask teachers to practice in the institute. I really enjoyed hearing how teachers appreciated learning that the literacy strategies are still relevant at the university level, and how seeing the Protocol in action took some of the worry about sharing their student work with participants.

“Among the valuable elements of the HSSP, the greatest is providing teachers the time and space to work on their practice and learn how to use best practices in their classrooms. I hope the HSSP continues to work to bring useful and inspiring professional development opportunities to elementary, middle, and high school history teachers by maintaining connections with university-level scholarship.”

-          Chrislaine Pamphile Miller, Ph.D.

Lecturer, CSU Monterey Bay & Santa Clara University

UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

 

#IamCHSSP: Chrislaine Pamphile Miller

created May 15, 2015 10:31 AM
Teacher facilitator Chrislaine Pamphile Miller is the focus of this post. She describes her connection with the California History-Social Science Project, how she first became involved and a ...

Teacher facilitator Chrislaine Pamphile Miller is the focus of this post. She describes her connection with the California History-Social Science Project, how she first became involved and a favorite moment from a summer institute. Help us thank teacher leaders like Chrislaine for their work at our 25th Anniversary celebration this November at UCLA.

“Currently, I am a teacher facilitator with the UC Berkeley History Social Science Project. I first became involved with UCBHSSP in 2001 as a middle school teacher in the Oakland Unified School District, where I participated in several summer institutes as a classroom teacher. Inspired by this experience with this program, I returned to graduate school for a Ph.D. in history and currently work at California State University Monterey Bay and Santa Clara University as a lecturer in the Global Studies and history departments.

“In addition to my teaching, I also work with UCBHSSP as a teacher facilitator for the summer Common Core Institutes and throughout the school year in the Santa Clara Unified School District teaching historical literacy strategies to middle and high school teachers.

“A recent favorite moment with the History Social Science Project occurred last summer, when I shared an undergraduate assignment with the Common Core Summer Institute participants. I demonstrated how I use literacy strategies with first-year university students and then had the teachers in the audience provide me with feedback for my lesson using the Lesson Protocol that we ask teachers to practice in the institute. I really enjoyed hearing how teachers appreciated learning that the literacy strategies are still relevant at the university level, and how seeing the Protocol in action took some of the worry about sharing their student work with participants.

“Among the valuable elements of the HSSP, the greatest is providing teachers the time and space to work on their practice and learn how to use best practices in their classrooms. I hope the HSSP continues to work to bring useful and inspiring professional development opportunities to elementary, middle, and high school history teachers by maintaining connections with university-level scholarship.”

-          Chrislaine Pamphile Miller, Ph.D.

Lecturer, CSU Monterey Bay & Santa Clara University

UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

 

#IamCHSSP celebration is six months away

As we gear up for our Teaching the Past for Tomorrow Conference and gala dinner, we will be posting more excepts and interviews about the people who have made CHSSP all that it is. Be sure to check our Blog for new posts. If you think of someone else who should be recognized, please let us know at .